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Des Femmes newsletter - Issue #21

Des Femmes newsletter
Des Femmes newsletter
Hello and welcome to the Des Femmes newsletter! 👋

We’re thrilled to be diving into our second print magazine production season, which will be published toward the end of 2022. Stay tuned for more on that later this year 👀
 👉In the meantime, we’re thrilled to announce open applications for our first developer mentorship program, sponsored by Superlunar and Chaincode Labs. 👈
Our 2022 mentorship program is open to feminist programmers of all genders, apply here to learn more about this unique opportunity!
Highlights of the month:
Recently, we’ve started career coaching sessions for Des Femmes community members, a worthy complement to our recruiting services for business partners. We also had the pleasure to host a series of IRL events in June, from Austin to New York City. More details from those adventures below. 
🔥 Des Femmes community members co-hosted a successful launch event for Clutch Wallet, and this very newsletter is now featured in the wallet’s in-app news feed. Congrats to Becca, founder of Clutch Wallet!
🔥 Des Femmes multisig keyholder Shira Eisenberg had a blast learning about CabinDAO in Texas, saying our community retreat “provided an opportunity to connect in person with other women passionate about financial independence and the role Bitcoin, crypto, on-chain organizations, and new governance structures can play in the transition [away] from a fiat-dominant society…. I look forward to seeing how future developing properties connect to their network of creator residences and how this experiment inspires trends within the decentralized community as a whole.” 
We partnered with Open Source Self-Defense for a small group class hosted outside Austin, Texas. Contributing editor Sterling Schuyler has this to say about her experience: 
My first time holding a gun was scary. It’s supposed to be.
“You should be scared of the sound of a gunshot.”
That was the most reaffirming piece of advice I’d ever heard about shooting a gun, shared by Kareem Shaya of Open Source Defense during our Des Femmes “cowgirl shooting” lessons. My husband had taken me shooting once before. Or rather, he tried. He took me to an indoor shooting range, and then proceeded to explain how to hold and shoot a gun while I was wearing ear protection. So many moons ago, the echoes of the other guns had reverberated in the indoor range with low ceilings and limited space was overwhelming. And when he tried to hand me the gun after two minutes of instructions, I was completely overwhelmed.
Flash forward to the outdoor shooting range in Texas: an expansive field, a cloudless blue sky, no one around (except for a plethora of insects), and a couple of overhangs. Before we started the lesson, Shaya asked us why we were all there. On one hand, the question invites a difficult conversation steeped in political beliefs. On the other hand, it opens up a conversation about the role that we believe guns might play in our lives.
One person said that she recently bought a gun, and she wanted to make sure she knew how to use it and take care of it. Another woman realized that, as a recently single mother of two children, she felt like she had no way to protect or defend her family in case of an intrusion. Another woman felt unsafe walking around in her daily life. In all honesty, I had never considered why I wanted to attend the lesson, other than that I didn’t want to be afraid of holding a gun. It had never occurred to me how important it is to have a reason. Gun ownership and use always seemed so foreign to me.
We talked about the modern history of guns, the safety rules of gun use, and finally, how to use a gun. Then we dry fired (pulled the trigger without ammo in the gun). Next we put a couple bullets in the magazine and fired individually at our own targets. For many, an hour of safety and instruction on how to hold a gun may seem excessive and tedious. But it was exactly what I needed to prepare myself.
The fact that Shaya started with the statement that guns are scary immediately reassured me that this person truly cared about gun safety and understood where I was coming from. Using guns still doesn’t feel natural to me. No matter how many times I fired, I still felt myself shake and close my eyes before I finished pulling the trigger. But being around people I knew and having an instructor who emphasized safety above all made me feel much more comfortable. That, in itself, was a memorable achievement on my personal road to self-sovereignty.
We partnered with Open Source Self-Defense for a small group class hosted outside Austin, Texas. Contributing editor Sterling Schuyler has this to say about her experience: 
My first time holding a gun was scary. It’s supposed to be.
“You should be scared of the sound of a gunshot.”
That was the most reaffirming piece of advice I’d ever heard about shooting a gun, shared by Kareem Shaya of Open Source Defense during our Des Femmes “cowgirl shooting” lessons. My husband had taken me shooting once before. Or rather, he tried. He took me to an indoor shooting range, and then proceeded to explain how to hold and shoot a gun while I was wearing ear protection. So many moons ago, the echoes of the other guns had reverberated in the indoor range with low ceilings and limited space was overwhelming. And when he tried to hand me the gun after two minutes of instructions, I was completely overwhelmed.
Flash forward to the outdoor shooting range in Texas: an expansive field, a cloudless blue sky, no one around (except for a plethora of insects), and a couple of overhangs. Before we started the lesson, Shaya asked us why we were all there. On one hand, the question invites a difficult conversation steeped in political beliefs. On the other hand, it opens up a conversation about the role that we believe guns might play in our lives.
One person said that she recently bought a gun, and she wanted to make sure she knew how to use it and take care of it. Another woman realized that, as a recently single mother of two children, she felt like she had no way to protect or defend her family in case of an intrusion. Another woman felt unsafe walking around in her daily life. In all honesty, I had never considered why I wanted to attend the lesson, other than that I didn’t want to be afraid of holding a gun. It had never occurred to me how important it is to have a reason. Gun ownership and use always seemed so foreign to me.
We talked about the modern history of guns, the safety rules of gun use, and finally, how to use a gun. Then we dry fired (pulled the trigger without ammo in the gun). Next we put a couple bullets in the magazine and fired individually at our own targets. For many, an hour of safety and instruction on how to hold a gun may seem excessive and tedious. But it was exactly what I needed to prepare myself.
The fact that Shaya started with the statement that guns are scary immediately reassured me that this person truly cared about gun safety and understood where I was coming from. Using guns still doesn’t feel natural to me. No matter how many times I fired, I still felt myself shake and close my eyes before I finished pulling the trigger. But being around people I knew and having an instructor who emphasized safety above all made me feel much more comfortable. That, in itself, was a memorable achievement on my personal road to self-sovereignty.
🔥 We had a blast celebrating Pride Month with a brunch for queer women investors and Des Femmes community members in Manhattan.
Community spotlight:
We partnered with Open Source Self-Defense for a small group class hosted outside Austin, Texas. Contributing editor Sterling Schuyler has this to say about her experience: 
My first time holding a gun was scary. It’s supposed to be.
“You should be scared of the sound of a gunshot.”
That was the most reaffirming piece of advice I’d ever heard about shooting a gun, shared by Kareem Shaya of Open Source Defense during our Des Femmes “cowgirl shooting” lessons. My husband had taken me shooting once before. Or rather, he tried. He took me to an indoor shooting range, and then proceeded to explain how to hold and shoot a gun while I was wearing ear protection. So many moons ago, the echoes of the other guns had reverberated in the indoor range with low ceilings and limited space was overwhelming. And when he tried to hand me the gun after two minutes of instructions, I was completely overwhelmed.
Flash forward to the outdoor shooting range in Texas: an expansive field, a cloudless blue sky, no one around (except for a plethora of insects), and a couple of overhangs. Before we started the lesson, Shaya asked us why we were all there. On one hand, the question invites a difficult conversation steeped in political beliefs. On the other hand, it opens up a conversation about the role that we believe guns might play in our lives.
One person said that she recently bought a gun, and she wanted to make sure she knew how to use it and take care of it. Another woman realized that, as a recently single mother of two children, she felt like she had no way to protect or defend her family in case of an intrusion. Another woman felt unsafe walking around in her daily life. In all honesty, I had never considered why I wanted to attend the lesson, other than that I didn’t want to be afraid of holding a gun. It had never occurred to me how important it is to have a reason. Gun ownership and use always seemed so foreign to me.
We talked about the modern history of guns, the safety rules of gun use, and finally, how to use a gun. Then we dry fired (pulled the trigger without ammo in the gun). Next we put a couple bullets in the magazine and fired individually at our own targets. For many, an hour of safety and instruction on how to hold a gun may seem excessive and tedious. But it was exactly what I needed to prepare myself.
The fact that Shaya started with the statement that guns are scary immediately reassured me that this person truly cared about gun safety and understood where I was coming from. Using guns still doesn’t feel natural to me. No matter how many times I fired, I still felt myself shake and close my eyes before I finished pulling the trigger. But being around people I knew and having an instructor who emphasized safety above all made me feel much more comfortable. That, in itself, was a memorable achievement on my personal road to self-sovereignty.
Many people have asked why Des Femmes community members write about guns, honey, and also bitcoin, confused about whether we’re actually a crypto-focused group. The answer is that we’re a group focused on self-sovereignty, seeking to increase women’s power through freedom of choice and access to resources. Whatever tools help women achieve a more holistic sense of wealth and confidence, that’s what we’re all about. People of all backgrounds and preferences who align with that goal are welcome! 
And last, but certainly not least, we’d like to shout out a huge thanks to everyone who participated in our final Gitcoin campaign! We didn’t reach our fundraising goal, so this second print edition will be our grand finale. We’ll share more details on our project evolution plans soon. Until then, be sure to follow us on Twitter or Instagram via @desfemmesmag. Not a member yet? Buy an official membership here.  
 
Until next time, stay curious!
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